Mortgage Loan Repurchase Agreement

In a repo, the investor/lender provides cash to a borrower, the loan being secured by the borrower`s collateral, usually bonds. If the borrower becomes insolvent, the guarantee is granted to the investor/lender. Investors are generally financial enterprises such as money funds, while borrowers are non-intrusive financial institutions, such as investment banks and hedge funds. The investor/lender calculates an interest rate called “pension rate” $X the granting of loans and recovers a higher amount $Y. In addition, the investor/lender may demand guarantees that require a value greater than the amount he lends. This difference is the “haircut.” These concepts are illustrated in the diagram and in the equations section. If investors are at greater risk, they may charge higher pension interest rates and demand higher reductions. A third party may be involved to facilitate the transaction; In this case, the transaction is called a “tri-party deposit.” [3] Post-101: Mortgage repurchase facilities first appeared on withheld interest. In addition to the margin mechanics (which generally facilitates the payment of a given loan of less than the repo loan for that loan), the bank`s documentation also contains triggers that require, if necessary, the full redemption (i.e. repayment) of the amount advanced under the repo in connection with a loan. These events, known as “buyback events,” vary from repo to repo, but often involve the appearance of a borrower default as part of the loan. The deposit market is an important source of money for large financial institutions in the non-deposit banking sector, which can compete with the traditional bank deposit sector in its size. Large institutional investors, such as money funds, lend money to financial institutions such as investment banks, either in exchange (or through secured guarantees), such as government bonds and mortgage-backed securities held by borrowing financial institutions.

It is estimated that $1 trillion a day of guarantees are being implemented in U.S. pension markets. [1] [2] While conventional deposits are generally credit risk instruments, there are residual credit risks. Although this is essentially a guaranteed transaction, the seller may not buy back the securities sold on the due date. In other words, the pension seller does not fulfill his obligation. Therefore, the buyer can keep the warranty and liquidate the guarantee to recover the borrowed money. However, security may have lost value since the beginning of the operation, as security is subject to market movements. To reduce this risk, deposits are often over-insured and subject to a daily market margin (i.e., if the guarantee ends in value, a margin call may be triggered to ask the borrower to reserve additional securities).