What Did The Munich Agreement Do

The slogan “Above us, without us!” (Czech: O n`s bez n`s!) sums up the feelings of the Czechoslovakian population (Slovakia and the Czech Republic) towards the agreement. [Citation required] On its way to Germany, Czechoslovakia (as the state was renamed) lost its reasonable border with Germany and its fortifications. Without it, its independence became more nominal than more real. The agreement also caused Czechoslovakia to lose 70% of its steel industry, 70% of its electricity and 3.5 million citizens to Germany. [61] The Sudeten Germans celebrated what they saw as their liberation. The impending war, it seemed, had been averted. (7) There is a right to vote in and out of the transferred territories, the possibility to exercise within six months from the date of this agreement. A German-Czechoslovakian commission defines the terms of the option, examines the possibilities of facilitating the transmission of the population and resolves the fundamental issues arising from this transfer. During the Second World War, British Prime Minister Churchill, who opposed the agreement when it was signed, decided not to abide by the terms of the post-war agreement and to bring the Sudetenland back to post-war Czechoslovakia. On August 5, 1942, Foreign Minister Anthony Eden sent Jan Masaryk the following note: The New York Times made the front page of the Munich agreement: “Hitler received less than his claims from the Sudetenland” and reported that a “joyful crowd” had applauded Daladier on his return to France and that Chamberlain had been “harassed” on his return to Britain.

[54] Czechoslovakia was informed by Great Britain and France that it could either oppose Nazi Germany alone or submit to the prescribed annexes. The Czechoslovakian government single-purposely acknowledged the desperation of the fight against the Nazis, reluctantly capitulated (30 September) and agreed to abide by the agreement. The colony gave Germany, from 10 October, the Sudetenland and de facto control of the rest of Czechoslovakia as long as Hitler promised not to go any further. On 30 September, after some time off, Chamberlain went to Hitler`s house and asked him to sign a peace treaty between the United Kingdom and Germany. After Hitler`s interpreter translated it for him, he was glad to have accepted it. 29-30 September 1938: Germany, Italy, Great Britain and France sign the Munich Agreement by which Czechoslovakia must cede its border and defensive regions (the so-called Sudetenland) to Nazi Germany. German troops occupied these territories between 1 and 10 October 1938. In the spring of 1938, Hitler openly began to support calls from German spokesmen living in the Sudetenland region of Czechoslovakia for closer relations with Germany. Hitler had recently annexed Austria to Germany and the conquest of Czechoslovakia was the next step in his plan to create a “Greater Germany”. The Czechoslovakian government hoped that Britain and France would help in the event of a German invasion, but British Prime Minister Chamberlain tried to avoid war.

He made two trips to Germany in September and offered favorable agreements to Hitler, but Fuhrer responded to his demands. The Munich Pact was an agreement reached on 29 September 1938 in Munich between Germany, Great Britain, France and Italy on the abandonment of the territory to Germany. The American historian William L. Shirer estimated in his “Rise and Fall of the Third Reich” (1960) that Czechoslovakia, although Hitler was not bluffing about its intention to invade, could have resisted considerably.